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The DIY Multideck

Introduction

The DIY multideck is a deck of 162 playing cards (3 standard decks) that allows you to play hundreds of existing games, not only classic card games but also modern games that use components like boards or coins. The DIY multideck is ideal for traveling and prototyping new games. The cards are waterproof and very resistant, ready to join you on your next trip!

This is how it works: when you play a game, you pick a subset of cards and focus on a specific corner. Sometimes, you may draw on the cards to play games that use words, icons, or boards. On the official website, you'll find instructions to play many games. Here are some example games for every game system supported:

Preview of some cards of The DIY Multideck

Feature summary

Card Anatomy

The normal cards have the following features:

  1. Basic Suit
  2. 3D Suit
  3. Sequential Number
  4. Pyramidal Rank
  5. Coin Flip
  6. Drawing Areas
  7. Counter (on the back face)

The following diagram shows where each feature is located with a graphic explanation:

card anatomy

Besides the normal cards, there are 2 extra cards with different designs.

These are some example cards: one of each basic suit, the 2 extra cards, and 1 card back.

example-cards

Basic Suit

In the top left and bottom right corners, there's a number overlapping an emoji (suit), it is the "Basic Suit".

It is the most used game system of the deck, and thus, the easiest to use. When mapping new games, always give priority to it.

It contains 8 suits (πŸ”₯πŸ’§β­πŸ€πŸŠπŸ†πŸ’­πŸ•·οΈ) of 15 ranks (0...9 + XJQKA), named 15-ranked suits, and 4 suits (πŸŒΈπŸ’ŽπŸ’©πŸ—Ώ) of 10 ranks (0...9), named 10-ranked suits. They can be combined into several distributions.

Suits

The suits can be classified into 2 categories by the number of ranks they contain. So there are the "15-ranked suits" (πŸ”₯πŸ’§β­πŸ€πŸŠπŸ†πŸ’­πŸ•·οΈ), and "10-ranked suits" (πŸŒΈπŸ’ŽπŸ’©πŸ—Ώ).

Emoji Name Color Id Ranks Coin
πŸ”₯ Fire
Red
0 0...9 + XJQKA ❌
πŸ’§ Water
Blue
1 0...9 + XJQKA βœ…
⭐ Stars
Yellow
2 0...9 + XJQKA ❌
πŸ€ Clubs
Green
3 0...9 + XJQKA βœ…
🍊 Oranges
Orange
4 0...9 + XJQKA ❌
πŸ† Eggplants
Purple
5 0...9 + XJQKA βœ…
πŸ’­ Clouds
White
6 0...9 + XJQKA ❌
πŸ•·οΈ Spiders
Black
7 0...9 + XJQKA βœ…
🌸 Flowers
Pink
8 0...9 ?
πŸ’Ž Diamonds
Cyan
9 0...9 ?
πŸ’© Poops
Brown
10 0...9 ?
πŸ—Ώ Moais
Gray
11 0...9 ?

Each suit has a fixed coin flip value. For example, πŸ”₯ is always ❌.

Each suit has a numerical ID (called "Suit ID"), it can be found on the black part of the Sequential Number.

Notice that the 15-ranked suits (πŸ”₯πŸ’§β­πŸ€πŸŠπŸ†πŸ’­πŸ•·οΈ), and 10-ranked suits (πŸŒΈπŸ’ŽπŸ’©πŸ—Ώ) can be differentiated by the suit ID. The first 8 suits (IDs 0 to 7) are 15-ranked, and the remaining 4 suits (IDs 8 to 11) are 10-ranked.

All suits are emojis, so you can easily write cheat sheets on your phone and send them to the other players.

Ranks

  • 0...9: Numeric ranks (0123456789).
    • 0 can be used as a Joker or wildcards.
    • 0 can be used as 10 in some games.
    • 1 can be used as an Ace.
  • XJQKA: Letter ranks.
    • They are: 10, Jack, Queen, King, Ace.
    • Can be used as 10, 11, 12, 13, 14.

The other corners' numbers always end with this suit's number. Except when the rank is XJQKA, then the corners end with 01234 or 56789, respectively. For example, when the rank is A, the other corners end in 4 or 9.

When the rank is a letter (XJQKA), the 3D suit is either black ( black ) or rainbow ( rainbow ).

Distributions

12 suits of 10 ranks

One combination is 12 suits (πŸ”₯πŸ’§β­πŸ€πŸŠπŸ†πŸ’­πŸ•·οΈπŸŒΈπŸ’ŽπŸ’©πŸ—Ώ) of 10 ranks (0...9).

There will be some unused cards, that may be optionally used to add extra ranks to some suits. The remaining cards are: the 5 letter ranks (XJQKA) of the 15-ranked suits (πŸ”₯πŸ’§β­πŸ€πŸŠπŸ†πŸ’­πŸ•·οΈ).

To get it, pick all the cards, and remove the letter ranks (XJQKA).

Switch the suits for the ranks to have 10 suits (0...9) of 12 ranks (πŸ”₯πŸ’§β­πŸ€πŸŠπŸ†πŸ’­πŸ•·οΈπŸŒΈπŸ’ŽπŸ’©πŸ—Ώ). Only use this if you need 9 or 10 suits of 11 or 12 ranks.

8 suits of 15 ranks

Another combination is 8 suits (πŸ”₯πŸ’§β­πŸ€πŸŠπŸ†πŸ’­πŸ•·οΈ) of 15 ranks (0...9 + XJQKA).

There will be some unused cards, that may be optionally used to add extra suits. The remaining cards are: all the ranks (0...9) of the 10-ranked suits (πŸŒΈπŸ’ŽπŸ’©πŸ—Ώ).

To get it, pick all the cards, and remove the 10-ranked suits (πŸŒΈπŸ’ŽπŸ’©πŸ—Ώ).

Switch the suits for the ranks to have 15 suits (0...9 + XJQKA) of 8 ranks (πŸ”₯πŸ’§β­πŸ€πŸŠπŸ†πŸ’­πŸ•·οΈ). Only use this if you need 13 to 15 suits of 8 or fewer ranks.

10-Level Pyramidal Deck with the Same Ranks

You can also create a pyramidal deck of 10 levels, where each suit has the same rank. To do this, pick one 1, two 2's, three 3s... Up to ten 0's (0 would count as 10), regardless of the suit you choose.

12-Level Pyramidal Deck with Different Ranks

You can also create a pyramidal deck of 12 levels, where each suit has different ranks. To do this, for every suit, pick a different number of cards: 1, 2, 3, ..., 10, 11, 12. Make sure that the suits that are repeated 12 and 11 times are the 15-ranked suits (πŸ”₯πŸ’§β­πŸ€πŸŠπŸ†πŸ’­πŸ•·οΈ). Each level uses a different suit, and there's no rank indicating how many cards that level has.

An example game that uses it is Startups.

Layout

mini-cards-basic

3D Suit

In the top-right or bottom-left corner, you can find a number overlapping a shape with two small numbers on the bottom sides; it is the "3D suit". It is called 3D because it is a multidimensional game system of 3 dimensions: shape, rank, and color.

It contains 10 ranks (0...9) Γ— 3 shapes (πŸ–€βš«οΈβ¬›οΈ) Γ— 5 colors ( red  blue  green  yellow  black ), plus 10 ranks (0...9) in a special shape and color (🌈). So it is a distribution of 10Γ—3Γ—5 + 10.

The small numbers on the bottom sides indicate the shape and color. This is useful for color-blind players and for quick comparison of suits. Each shape and circle has an associated number; these are the values:

  • Left numbers (Shape): 1=πŸ–€, 2=⚫️, 3=⬛️, 4=🌈.
  • Right numbers (Color): 1= red , 2= blue , 3= green , 4= yellow , 5= black , 6= rainbow .

When the suit is black ( black ) or rainbow ( rainbow ), the rank of the Basic suit is a letter (XJQKA). Otherwise, when the suit is red, blue, green, or yellow (), the rank of the Basic suit is a number (0...9).

Distributions

5 Suits of 3 Times 10 Ranks

The most used distribution of the 3D suit is 5 suits ( red  blue  green  yellow  black ) of 3 times 10 ranks (0...9). Plus an extra suit (🌈) of 1 time 10 ranks (0...9).

The shape (πŸ–€βš«οΈβ¬›οΈ) is not used in this distribution. When two suits have the same color, but different shape, they are considered equal. For example: πŸ”΅ and 🟦 are the same because they are blue ().

A very well-known game that uses this distribution is UNO.

5 Suits of 30 Ranks

Same as 5 suits of 3 times 10 ranks, but use the left number (indicating the shape) minus 1 as the tens' digit. It has 5 suits ( red  blue  green  yellow  black ) of 30 ranks (0...29).

For example: Example 3D suit ( blue , 3, πŸ–€) is the 3 of blue () because its left number is 1, we subtract 1, the result is 0, and using it as the tens' digit we get 03, that is the same as just 3.

A game that uses this distribution is What the Heck?.

3 Suits of 5 Times 10 Ranks

Another distribution of the 3D suit is 3 suits (πŸ–€βš«οΈβ¬›οΈ) of 5 times 10 ranks (0...9). Plus an extra suit (🌈) of 1 time 10 ranks (0...9).

The color ( red  blue  green  yellow  black ) is not used in this distribution. When two suits have the same shape, but different color, they are considered equal. For example: πŸ”΄ and πŸ”΅ are the same because they are circles (⚫️).

3 Suits of 50 Ranks

Same as 3 suits of 5 times 10 ranks, but use the right number (indicating the color) minus 1 as the tens' digit. It has 3 suits (πŸ–€βš«οΈβ¬›οΈ) of 50 ranks (0...49).

For example: Example 3D suit ( blue , 3, πŸ–€) is the 13 of hearts πŸ–€ because its right number is 2, we subtract 1, the result is 1, and using it as the tens' digit we get 13.

Multi-dimensional System of 10 by 3 by 5

You can create a multi-dimensional game system with 3 dimensions:

  • Dimension 1: 10 Ranks (0...9).
  • Dimension 2: 3 Shapes (πŸ–€βš«οΈβ¬›οΈ)
  • Dimension 3: 5 Colors ( red  blue  green  yellow  black )

Besides that, there's an extra shape and color (🌈) that is not in the other shapes or colors, and it has the numbers 0 to 9.

Not many games use it.

Layout

mini-cards-3d

Sequential number

On the top-right or bottom-left corner, you can find a number without a suit behind; it is the "Sequential number."

It contains numbers from 0 to 159.

Because each card has a different number, it is used to reference the cards.

The number has two colors:

  • The black part indicates the number of the suit. When the sequential number is greater than 120, it no longer indicates the suit number.
    • For example, the card 117 has the suit πŸ—Ώ, and is the suit number 11 because the black part of the number is 11.
  • The colored part matches the color of the basic suit of that card. It also matches the rank of the basic suit, and the 3D suit (except when the rank is a letter (XJQKA)).

Distributions

Numbers from 0 to 159

Just use the Sequential number as is.

It is used in games that need many unsuited ranks. Games that use it are The mind and No thanks!.

Numbers from 0 to 59, 2 times

You can also have 2 times numbers from 0 to 59, plus 1 time numbers from 60 to 99, by ignoring the hundreds digit. So, for example, 120 would become 20, and 20 would stay as 20.

Numbers from -59 to 100

Similarly, you can also have negative numbers if you treat numbers greater than 100 as negative (or positive), to make a distribution of -59...100 (or -100...59).

15 ordered suits of 10 ranks (or vice versa)

You can also make a distribution of 15 ordered suits of 10 ranks (or vice versa) by making the black part the suit, and the colored part the rank.

But it is quite unintuitive to use, so only use this combination if you need ordered suits, or 13 to 15 suits of 9...10 ranks; otherwise, it's better to use the "switched" basic suit.

Layout

mini-cards-sequential

Pyramidal Rank

Under the Sequential Number, there's a small number indicating the "Pyramidal rank."

  • On the 8 15-ranked suits (πŸ”₯πŸ’§β­πŸ€πŸŠπŸ†πŸ’­πŸ•·οΈ), each suit has: five 1's, four 2's, three 3's, two 4's, and one 5.
  • On the 4 10-ranked suits (πŸŒΈπŸ’ŽπŸ’©πŸ—Ώ), each suit has: four 1's, three 2's, two 3's, and one 4.

The Pyramidal Rank has the color of the Basic Suit in that card.

The Pyramidal Rank can be used as an alternative rank for games that require an uneven number of specific ranks, like Hanabi.

Distributions

8 times: five 1s, four 2s, three 3s, two 4s, one 5

Use the Pyramidal Rank of the 15-ranked suits.

There will be leftover cards that may be used if the game needs more suits. The unused cards are 4 times: four 1's, three 2's, two 3's, and one 4.

12 times: four 1s, three 2s, two 3s, one 4

Use the Pyramidal Rank of the 10-ranked suits and 15-ranked suits, but excluding the 5s.

Other Pyramidal Decks

You can also make pyramidal decks of 10-12 levels without using the Pyramidal Ranks. Learn how in the Basic Suit section.

Layout

mini-cards-pyramidal

Coin flip

Under the sequential number, there's an icon representing "yes" (βœ…), "no" (❌) or "unknown" (?).

There are 60 βœ…, 60 ❌ and 40 ?.

  • The 4 first even suits (πŸ”₯β­πŸŠπŸ’­) have a ❌.
  • The 4 first odd suits (πŸ’§πŸ€πŸ†πŸ•·οΈ) have a βœ….
  • The 4 10-ranked suits (πŸŒΈπŸ’ŽπŸ’©πŸ—Ώ), have a ?.

The coin flip icon has the color of the basic suit in that card.

It comes in handy when players need to emit a vote and reveal them all at the same time. This voting mechanism can be found in The Resistance: Avalon and Secret Hitler.

Another usage is when there are many copies of 2 to 3 kinds of cards. The game Skulls and Roses uses this feature where ❌ are skulls and βœ… are roses.

Drawing

The cards are designed to be drawn on with a pencil, and they have a grid marking out the "drawing areas".

Why drawing?

Even though it may seem that by drawing you'll destroy your cards, make them ugly, or waste them, the truth is the opposite: if you don't draw on them, you're wasting the cards, because they are meant for that. The DIY Multideck provides a solid base to play many games and, additionally, draw in the cards to support more games. Drawing on the cards also makes games easier to play because the drawings can resemble the original game card's.

Rather than filling the cards with predetermined games, I want to encourage you to personalize them by adding the games you enjoy playing. This is why it's called "The DIY Multideck".

Drawing tips

Use a pencil to draw so you can erase or tweak the drawing if needed. Pens, markers, and other things also work, but I don't recommend using them because making changes is very common.

Anyways, although you can erase the drawings, I generally don't recommend doing it. If you keep the drawings, you won't have to spend time again to prepare that game. It is generally not annoying to play with drawings from other games.

When adding new drawings:

  • Consider duplicating the drawing on the opposite side slots to make the card playable in any rotation.
  • Place them strategically to leave the most usable spots for your favorite games.
  • Try to come up with generic drawings that may be used in other games, so you save up space.

In some cases generic drawings can be counter-productive, so be mindful. For example, consider two unrelated games (A and B) using a similar drawing. On game A, there's a card with a drawing. That same card is also used in game B. But game B is not supposed to have a drawing on that card. So a player can mistakenly think that that card in game B is something special when it is not.

Drawing areas

card

Each card has 14 drawing slots, grouped in 5 drawing areas.

"Drawing area A icon" Drawing area A

2 rectangular slots on the top and bottom edges.

  • The card needs to be held in hand and contain a big drawing or word.
  • The card needs to be stacked on the table while keeping the top or bottom part visible.

"Drawing area B icon" Drawing area B

4 square slots just below every suit.

  • The card needs to be held in hand.
  • The drawing is related to the suit.

"Drawing area C icon" Drawing area C

6 square slots between the Drawing areas B, in groups of 3 columns.

  • The card needs a hint, like punctuation.
  • The card's hint doesn't need to be visible while holding it on hand; otherwise, use the area A.

"Drawing area D icon" Drawing area D

4 rectangular slots in the center, forming a 2x2 grid.

  • The card needs to be placed on the table.
  • The card can be held in hand, but it's the only one.
  • The card needs to contain a big drawing or word.
  • The card is not used actively during the gameplay, like hints or boards, and your notes cards are full.

"Drawing area E icon" Drawing area E

1 circular slot in the center, overlapping the Drawing areas D.

  • You want to represent a tile, chip, token, or similar.
  • The card needs to be placed on the table.

Counters

The back side of the cards also has utility, they serve as counters.

Optional: You can add a title to the counter by writing it in the area A of a card and putting it below.

Don't overuse this technique or you'll run out of space. For example, if every player only has to count coins, don't put titles on the counters; it's assumed they are coins.

Stacking method

Stacking counter

Count from 0 to 30 with less than 10 cards.

Stack cards upright (worth 1) or upside-down (worth 5), the sum is the result.

The example is counting 13, 3 times 1 plus 2 times 5.

  • Cards can be held in the hand.
  • Convenient when coins are exchanged frequently by the players.
  • Use when the counter needs to be "private" (only known by the own player).

Pointing method

Pointing counter

Count from 0 to 10 with only 2 cards.

Put 2 cards on top of each other, and align the arrow from the card in front to point a number in the card on the back, the pointed number is the result.

The example is counting 1 because the arrow is pointing at 1.

  • Watch out not to move the cards by mistake or you'll lose the count.
  • You can rotate the front card, and count negative or positive points.

It works well as point tracking boards, like the one in the game Jekyll vs Hyde.

Chained pointing method

Chained pointing counter

Count any amount with very few cards.

Create a pointing counter for every digit of the result number.

The example is counting 950; each of the counters is counting 9, 5, and 0, respectively. If you concatenate the digits, you get the number 950. To create it follow these steps:

  1. Take 6 cards (2 for each digit).
  2. Create 3 counters side by side (using the pointing method).
  3. Move the first pointing card to 9, the second to 5, and the third to 0.
  4. The first counter represents the hundreds, the second the tens, and the third the units.

You can also represent decimal numbers with this method, by defining a counter as the decimal point.

Extra cards

When printing cards on an A3-sized paper, there's room for 18 cards per page. This deck uses 160 cards, leaving 2 blank spaces. These 2 spaces are used in the form of "Extra Cards," which don't have any suit or rank.

You can use the extra cards in games that need a card with a different background and no information on the front (you can also flip a normal card, but it can be confusing). For example, in The Crew, the "reminder cards".

Cover card

card

Only 1 copy.

Contains:

  • Name of the deck.
  • Preview of all basic suits.
  • QR code pointing to the website.

Notes cards

card

3 copies (in 2 cards).

Use them to keep any useful information.

Some use cases are:

  • Player aid.
  • Simplified game board.
  • Game setup (what cards, how many per player...).
  • Definition/Diagram of a specific rule or mechanic.
  • List of games in the deck.

Other

Mapping new games

You may want to play a game that is not on the official supported games list, so here you have some tips about how to do it.

Step 1: Finding the game's components

The first thing you have to figure out is the components used on the game, how they are used, and which can be eliminated. To do so I recommend:

  • Find the official rulebook, usually there's a section with the game's components.
    • To find it, google the game's name plus "rulebook" or "rules".
    • You can also go to the game's Board Game Geek entry Files section, usually you find the rules in a PDF.
    • If none of that works, try looking for the rulebook in other languages like German, Spanish, or French.
  • Find unofficial rulebooks or other resources explaining the game, there are websites dedicated to this.
  • Search for images of the game.
    • For example on Google Images, Board Game Geek, or eCommerces selling the game.
  • Watch unboxings or how to play videos of the game.
  • Try to find a print and play version of the game.
  • Find a fanmade re-theme of the game.
    • Usually they are on the game's Board Game Geek entry Files section.

Step 2: Map the game

Next, you have to map every component of the game to a feature of The DIY Multideck.

My recommendation is that you go to the Feature summary to find out what's the best game system to use.

You can also quickly spot the main game system (Basic, 3D, Sequential, Pyramidal, or Voting) by answering the following questions in order: (There are edge cases not covered)

  1. Does it use coins, chips, tokens, progress boards, or similar things? β†’ Counter.
  2. Does it just use 3 or fewer types of cards repeated many times? β†’ Coin flip.
  3. Does it need 1 or 2 cards with a different back face? β†’ Extra cards
  4. Does it need icons, words, or extra info on the card (a.k.a. drawings)? β†’ Drawing.
  5. Does it have 8 or fewer suits of 15 or fewer ranks? β†’ Basic.
  6. Does it have 12 or fewer suits of 10 or fewer ranks? β†’ Basic.
  7. Does it just have numbers, and are they larger than 30?
    1. Are there numbers larger than 160? β†’ Not compatible.
    2. Are there numbers repeated 2 or more times that are larger than 59? β†’ Not compatible.
    3. Else β†’ Sequential number.
  8. Does each rank get repeated?
    1. Is it repeated 4 or more times? β†’ Not compatible.
    2. Does it have 7 or more suits? β†’ Not compatible.
    3. Else β†’ 3D suit.
  9. Does it have 16 or more different ranks?.
    1. With 6 or more suits? β†’ Not compatible.
    2. Else β†’ 3D suit.
  10. Does it use a 3D deck of 5x3x10 or less? β†’ 3D suit.
  11. Does each suit have an uneven distribution where there's just numbers from 1 to 5? β†’ Pyramidal rank.
  12. Does it have more than 8 suits of more than 10 ranks each?
    1. Does it have more than 16 suits of more than 11 ranks (or vice versa)? β†’ Not compatible
    2. Else β†’ Sequential number.
  13. Else β†’ Probably "Not compatible" or "Low usability". Read the deck's manual deeper to find the right game system if it exists.

Now you just select the cards the game will need; it will probably be a subset of the game system chosen.

If the game has multiple components, you'll have to put more effort into trying to find a combination of cards that meets all the requirements. To do so, I recommend you pick the main game system used and use the respective layout (Basic, 3D, Sequential) as a visual aid to decide what cards to use for each component.

If the game needs drawings, read the Drawing section.

Step 3: Submit the mapping

Finally, send us the mapping to diymultideck@mauri.app so we can add it to the website and make it easily accessible to you and other people.

Printing

The cards are designed to be printed at home or a basic copy shop.

The material used is polyester 300 grams, almost all copy shops have it (at least in Spain), and it offers great resistance and is waterproof. The only downsides are that it is not environmentally friendly and that it is not fully opaque.

For now, the PDF document to print the cards is not public, but if I see a lot of interest, I may reconsider it and license them with a Creative Commons license.

Is all of this legal? Yes, it is. Selling/buying or printing the DIY Multideck is legal, even if the purpose is to play other games. Also, this website, with explanations of how to play other games, and all its contents, is legal.

Board games are generally not protected intellectual property. What is usually protected with copyright are the assets they use, like cards, tokens, boards, or rulebooks. Some game mechanics may be patented, but it's very rare.

Explaining how to play a board game is legal, as long as you don't use copyrighted material without permission to do so.

Regardless of all that, the original games will always be better than any adaptation done with the DIY Multideck, simply because the original games are made to play a single game. But meanwhile you don't own the game, you can at least play an inferior version of it.

Design choices

The rank is inside the suit to save up space. The downside is that it requires players to spread more the cards in hand to see the rank, but it's not uncomfortable.

All suits are emojis, so you can easily write cheat sheets on your phone and send them to the other players.

The colors of the suits can be grouped by similar hue in pairs but also trios. As a consequence, the Basic suit and 3D suit corners have similar colors. For example, the suit 🍊, which is orange ( orange ), has red ( red ) 3D suits.

The slogan "Draw your cards" is there to encourage people to draw and lose the fear of drawing in cards. It's fine! If you run out of space, you'll have amortized the cards very well, don't worry.

The first 10 numbers of the sequential number corner start with 0 to maintain the visual pattern of color in the number (left side black, right side colored).

The check is filled and the cross hollow to increase the contrast between the two icons. And the question mark is also different by removing the enclosing circle.

The coin flip icon and pyramidal rank are in the sequential number's corner to concentrate all the printed parts in the corners, so the rest of the space is perfectly symmetrical, and drawings can be drawn twice, upright and upside-down, to make cards work both orientations.

Small digits in the 3D deck corner start at 1 instead of 0 for a more natural use of the cards. However, this means you can't simply concatenate the digits to create numbers from 00 to 29, and you are required to perform subtraction.

The card backs use a lot of ink to increase the opacity of the card, especially on the corners, that's why the arrows are black.

Not all suits have the same amount of ranks. I decided to cut on some cards and make an overall uneven distribution because it's rare to find games that use high ranks (+10) and many suits (+8) at the same time. There are very few of those games because the amount of cards would grow to more than 150 and it feels too many cards to handle for the player. Moreover, games with many cards usually have several kinds of cards with low ranks, so you need more suits without mattering much the amount of ranks.

All the numbers on the card corners match (on the units), if the rank is not a letter (XJQKA).

Credits

The DIY multideck has been created in 2024 by Maurici Abad, a software engineer and backpacker from Spain.

The deck was heavily inspired by The Everdeck. Read more on the inspiration section.

Inspiration

I got inspired by The Everdeck and Rainbow deck mainly. But I found interesting ideas on other multidecks.

Other multidecks

Interesting articles or threads

Lists of possible compatible games

Appendix

All cards preview

This is how all the actual cards look like.

all cards preview

Cards spreadsheet

This are the values of each feature on all cards.

Basic 3D Sequential
Suit Rank Suit Rank C Rank L Rank R Number Pyramidal Coin flip
πŸ”₯ 0 ❀️ 0 1 1 0 0 1 ❌
πŸ”₯ 1 ❀️ 1 1 1 0 1 1 ❌
πŸ”₯ 2 ❀️ 2 1 1 0 2 2 ❌
πŸ”₯ 3 ❀️ 3 1 1 0 3 3 ❌
πŸ”₯ 4 ❀️ 4 1 1 0 4 2 ❌
πŸ”₯ 5 ❀️ 5 1 1 0 5 1 ❌
πŸ”₯ 6 ❀️ 6 1 1 0 6 1 ❌
πŸ”₯ 7 ❀️ 7 1 1 0 7 2 ❌
πŸ”₯ 8 ❀️ 8 1 1 0 8 3 ❌
πŸ”₯ 9 ❀️ 9 1 1 0 9 4 ❌
πŸ’§ 0 πŸ’™ 0 1 2 1 0 1 βœ…
πŸ’§ 1 πŸ’™ 1 1 2 1 1 1 βœ…
πŸ’§ 2 πŸ’™ 2 1 2 1 2 2 βœ…
πŸ’§ 3 πŸ’™ 3 1 2 1 3 3 βœ…
πŸ’§ 4 πŸ’™ 4 1 2 1 4 2 βœ…
πŸ’§ 5 πŸ’™ 5 1 2 1 5 1 βœ…
πŸ’§ 6 πŸ’™ 6 1 2 1 6 1 βœ…
πŸ’§ 7 πŸ’™ 7 1 2 1 7 2 βœ…
πŸ’§ 8 πŸ’™ 8 1 2 1 8 3 βœ…
πŸ’§ 9 πŸ’™ 9 1 2 1 9 4 βœ…
⭐ 0 πŸ’› 0 1 3 2 0 1 ❌
⭐ 1 πŸ’› 1 1 3 2 1 1 ❌
⭐ 2 πŸ’› 2 1 3 2 2 2 ❌
⭐ 3 πŸ’› 3 1 3 2 3 3 ❌
⭐ 4 πŸ’› 4 1 3 2 4 2 ❌
⭐ 5 πŸ’› 5 1 3 2 5 1 ❌
⭐ 6 πŸ’› 6 1 3 2 6 1 ❌
⭐ 7 πŸ’› 7 1 3 2 7 2 ❌
⭐ 8 πŸ’› 8 1 3 2 8 3 ❌
⭐ 9 πŸ’› 9 1 3 2 9 4 ❌
πŸ€ 0 πŸ’š 0 1 4 3 0 1 βœ…
πŸ€ 1 πŸ’š 1 1 4 3 1 1 βœ…
πŸ€ 2 πŸ’š 2 1 4 3 2 2 βœ…
πŸ€ 3 πŸ’š 3 1 4 3 3 3 βœ…
πŸ€ 4 πŸ’š 4 1 4 3 4 2 βœ…
πŸ€ 5 πŸ’š 5 1 4 3 5 1 βœ…
πŸ€ 6 πŸ’š 6 1 4 3 6 1 βœ…
πŸ€ 7 πŸ’š 7 1 4 3 7 2 βœ…
πŸ€ 8 πŸ’š 8 1 4 3 8 3 βœ…
πŸ€ 9 πŸ’š 9 1 4 3 9 4 βœ…
🍊 0 πŸ”΄ 0 2 1 4 0 1 ❌
🍊 1 πŸ”΄ 1 2 1 4 1 1 ❌
🍊 2 πŸ”΄ 2 2 1 4 2 2 ❌
🍊 3 πŸ”΄ 3 2 1 4 3 3 ❌
🍊 4 πŸ”΄ 4 2 1 4 4 2 ❌
🍊 5 πŸ”΄ 5 2 1 4 5 1 ❌
🍊 6 πŸ”΄ 6 2 1 4 6 1 ❌
🍊 7 πŸ”΄ 7 2 1 4 7 2 ❌
🍊 8 πŸ”΄ 8 2 1 4 8 3 ❌
🍊 9 πŸ”΄ 9 2 1 4 9 4 ❌
πŸ† 0 πŸ”΅ 0 2 2 5 0 1 βœ…
πŸ† 1 πŸ”΅ 1 2 2 5 1 1 βœ…
πŸ† 2 πŸ”΅ 2 2 2 5 2 2 βœ…
πŸ† 3 πŸ”΅ 3 2 2 5 3 3 βœ…
πŸ† 4 πŸ”΅ 4 2 2 5 4 2 βœ…
πŸ† 5 πŸ”΅ 5 2 2 5 5 1 βœ…
πŸ† 6 πŸ”΅ 6 2 2 5 6 1 βœ…
πŸ† 7 πŸ”΅ 7 2 2 5 7 2 βœ…
πŸ† 8 πŸ”΅ 8 2 2 5 8 3 βœ…
πŸ† 9 πŸ”΅ 9 2 2 5 9 4 βœ…
πŸ’­ 0 🟑 0 2 3 6 0 1 ❌
πŸ’­ 1 🟑 1 2 3 6 1 1 ❌
πŸ’­ 2 🟑 2 2 3 6 2 2 ❌
πŸ’­ 3 🟑 3 2 3 6 3 3 ❌
πŸ’­ 4 🟑 4 2 3 6 4 2 ❌
πŸ’­ 5 🟑 5 2 3 6 5 1 ❌
πŸ’­ 6 🟑 6 2 3 6 6 1 ❌
πŸ’­ 7 🟑 7 2 3 6 7 2 ❌
πŸ’­ 8 🟑 8 2 3 6 8 3 ❌
πŸ’­ 9 🟑 9 2 3 6 9 4 ❌
πŸ•·οΈ 0 🟒 0 2 4 7 0 1 βœ…
πŸ•·οΈ 1 🟒 1 2 4 7 1 1 βœ…
πŸ•·οΈ 2 🟒 2 2 4 7 2 2 βœ…
πŸ•·οΈ 3 🟒 3 2 4 7 3 3 βœ…
πŸ•·οΈ 4 🟒 4 2 4 7 4 2 βœ…
πŸ•·οΈ 5 🟒 5 2 4 7 5 1 βœ…
πŸ•·οΈ 6 🟒 6 2 4 7 6 1 βœ…
πŸ•·οΈ 7 🟒 7 2 4 7 7 2 βœ…
πŸ•·οΈ 8 🟒 8 2 4 7 8 3 βœ…
πŸ•·οΈ 9 🟒 9 2 4 7 9 4 βœ…
🌸 0 πŸŸ₯ 0 3 1 8 0 1 ?
🌸 1 πŸŸ₯ 1 3 1 8 1 1 ?
🌸 2 πŸŸ₯ 2 3 1 8 2 2 ?
🌸 3 πŸŸ₯ 3 3 1 8 3 3 ?
🌸 4 πŸŸ₯ 4 3 1 8 4 2 ?
🌸 5 πŸŸ₯ 5 3 1 8 5 1 ?
🌸 6 πŸŸ₯ 6 3 1 8 6 1 ?
🌸 7 πŸŸ₯ 7 3 1 8 7 2 ?
🌸 8 πŸŸ₯ 8 3 1 8 8 3 ?
🌸 9 πŸŸ₯ 9 3 1 8 9 4 ?
πŸ’Ž 0 🟦 0 3 2 9 0 1 ?
πŸ’Ž 1 🟦 1 3 2 9 1 1 ?
πŸ’Ž 2 🟦 2 3 2 9 2 2 ?
πŸ’Ž 3 🟦 3 3 2 9 3 3 ?
πŸ’Ž 4 🟦 4 3 2 9 4 2 ?
πŸ’Ž 5 🟦 5 3 2 9 5 1 ?
πŸ’Ž 6 🟦 6 3 2 9 6 1 ?
πŸ’Ž 7 🟦 7 3 2 9 7 2 ?
πŸ’Ž 8 🟦 8 3 2 9 8 3 ?
πŸ’Ž 9 🟦 9 3 2 9 9 4 ?
πŸ’© 0 🟨 0 3 3 10 0 1 ?
πŸ’© 1 🟨 1 3 3 10 1 1 ?
πŸ’© 2 🟨 2 3 3 10 2 2 ?
πŸ’© 3 🟨 3 3 3 10 3 3 ?
πŸ’© 4 🟨 4 3 3 10 4 2 ?
πŸ’© 5 🟨 5 3 3 10 5 1 ?
πŸ’© 6 🟨 6 3 3 10 6 1 ?
πŸ’© 7 🟨 7 3 3 10 7 2 ?
πŸ’© 8 🟨 8 3 3 10 8 3 ?
πŸ’© 9 🟨 9 3 3 10 9 4 ?
πŸ—Ώ 0 🟩 0 3 4 11 0 1 ?
πŸ—Ώ 1 🟩 1 3 4 11 1 1 ?
πŸ—Ώ 2 🟩 2 3 4 11 2 2 ?
πŸ—Ώ 3 🟩 3 3 4 11 3 3 ?
πŸ—Ώ 4 🟩 4 3 4 11 4 2 ?
πŸ—Ώ 5 🟩 5 3 4 11 5 1 ?
πŸ—Ώ 6 🟩 6 3 4 11 6 1 ?
πŸ—Ώ 7 🟩 7 3 4 11 7 2 ?
πŸ—Ώ 8 🟩 8 3 4 11 8 3 ?
πŸ—Ώ 9 🟩 9 3 4 11 9 4 ?
πŸ”₯ X πŸ–€ 0 1 5 12 0 5 ❌
πŸ”₯ J πŸ–€ 1 1 5 12 1 1 ❌
πŸ”₯ Q πŸ–€ 2 1 5 12 2 2 ❌
πŸ”₯ K πŸ–€ 3 1 5 12 3 3 ❌
πŸ”₯ A πŸ–€ 4 1 5 12 4 4 ❌
🍊 X πŸ–€ 5 1 5 12 5 5 ❌
🍊 J πŸ–€ 6 1 5 12 6 1 ❌
🍊 Q πŸ–€ 7 1 5 12 7 2 ❌
🍊 K πŸ–€ 8 1 5 12 8 3 ❌
🍊 A πŸ–€ 9 1 5 12 9 4 ❌
πŸ’§ X ⚫️ 0 2 5 13 0 5 βœ…
πŸ’§ J ⚫️ 1 2 5 13 1 1 βœ…
πŸ’§ Q ⚫️ 2 2 5 13 2 2 βœ…
πŸ’§ K ⚫️ 3 2 5 13 3 3 βœ…
πŸ’§ A ⚫️ 4 2 5 13 4 4 βœ…
πŸ† X ⚫️ 5 2 5 13 5 5 βœ…
πŸ† J ⚫️ 6 2 5 13 6 1 βœ…
πŸ† Q ⚫️ 7 2 5 13 7 2 βœ…
πŸ† K ⚫️ 8 2 5 13 8 3 βœ…